Trips, Tricks and no Ticks

Its was a very early start Saturday morning to get up and ready to so the radio show interview in St Johns, I talked about my research project with the Winston Churchill Fellowship, and plugged the show I was doing that weekend, got to ramble about general story-ness and told the Storytellers parable, and when they asked me if I knew any Newfie music which I would liked played I turned into a total girlie fan and blethered about Great Big Sea and Alan Doyle’s new album, so they played me one of his new songs – I was silly happy!!!!

 

I then went for a lovely brunch with Dale & Kelly after which I headed out to sea for a few hours whale watching.

Humpback whale tail

A Humpback Whale

Whilst out at sea I also got ‘Screeched’ a special ceremony to become an hounary Newfloundlander, which involved drinking dark rum, speaking special phrases and kissing a puffin’s bum! Now there’s a story!!!!

In the evening I went to see Dale Jarvis’ ‘Ghosts of Signal Hill’ show, which was an absolute treat, and I highly recommend to anyone who finda themselves in St Johns. After we headed out to Bay Roberts ready for my story show the next day, Which went amazingly well, more people turned up than expected and everyone seemed to really enjoy the stories and my energetic style. I also learnt that St Johns has no posionious plants no snakes, frogs or ticks.

Monday morning I left St Johns to return to Toronto so that Tuesday I could retunr to the Stop and tell some more stories at the women’s group, and because the summer camp was on I ended up telling to the kids camp and the women’s group. again it went really well and because the kids thought I looked like the Princess from Brave, I told some Scottish stories. I then headed to the Academy of the Impossible to meet Emily Pohl-Weary a writer who works with creative youths in Toronto. I interviewed a few of the attendees and Emily and got a really good prespective on how youths in Toronto (and I suspect elsewhere) find out about activities that they are interested in, and their views on storytelling, and all of them from hip-hop artists to playwright, games designers and poet all told me they were heavily drawing on storytelling to support their work.

Wednesday I back up to Ottawa for an evening interviewing the Ottawa storytellers about youth storytelling, in the gathering were a collaction of tellers who work with youth tellers, are youth tellers, and those just interested in the discussion. from that I have serveral hours of audio recording to sit through and write up… a good evening with good food and lots to think about.

Then back to Toronto for the last few days before heading to San Fran, and while out shopping earlier I bumped into Trick form the series ‘Lost Girl’ I was very excited (lucky it wasn’t Dyson, Vex or Kensi!). And as a parting shot t to the hostel I have been staying in and the many new friends I have made there, I am telling tonight as part of the wine and cheese evening.

Black board in hostel advertising my show tonight

The sight that greeted me at breakfast this morning! Good Stuff!!!

 

 

Toronto to St John’s

I was meant to leave Toronto on the 11th to head to St John’s, but after having a wonderful lunch with Donna Dudinsky after the Storytent last Saturday and finding out that the Racontuers (a storyslam in Toronto) meeting was also on the 11th I changed my flight and attended.

It was a very interesting evening, as only a couple of days before I had been sat in Dan Yashinsky’s garden talking about youth storytelling and how he percieved that a lot more talented young people were interested in storytelling in the UK than in Canada. But when I entered the wonderfully named ‘No One Writes To The Colonel’ 460 College St, what a feast beheld my eyes.

Racontuers Story Slam

Racontuers Story Slam @ No One Writes To The Colonel

The bar was packed, every available seat was taken, people gathered huddle in any space they could get, it was amazing to see just how many people had turned out on a hot summer evening to cram themselves into the wonderfully record bespotted performance space. And even more amazing was that the vast majority were 20-40yr olds, with the occassional older folk peppered amoungst the crowd.

As the evening began and the stories started it proved to be such a range, and dynamic of tellers. The theme this month was ‘Music’ and before each teller told the MC announced their name and their favourite song, which already gave an idea of the person we were about to see. Coming from the UK my ear is not atuned so much to the personal stories which seem to heavily fill repetoires in Canada and the US, and it should be noted that Racontuers only accepts personal stories, so I did not enter as a teller, for I have had no experince with playing with personal tales. Some tellers told of seeing their favourite band live, some told of how they developed their first crush on the favourite popstar, some told of their own personal connection to music through playing, and just like everything to do with music there was also a touch or sex, drugs and rock and roll!

Tellers told in blocks of three with a break inbetween each block, where tellers were greeted by eager audience members to congratulate them on their telling. All tellers told through a mic and even the quiet ones could be heard by all. Some tellers were newbies and other were old hats, but all were welcomed by a very story hungry audience.

At this point I must admit I was more fasinated by the dynamic in the room than the stories, not that they weren’t good, but like I say I’m not use to personal tales and at times for me it felt a bit like watching stand-up comedy without the punch lines. I didn’t not enjoy it, and I don’t mean to sound like a story snob, because believe me anything that can generate the amount of people in a room for storytelling I’m all for, its just I found it hard to recognise it as storytelling that I am familiar with for it is such a different style. But I have been told that is also how it feels in reverse, many people who have only had personal tales find it hard to listen to what they determine over here as ‘folk tales’ (which back home refers to a certain genre of stories, rather than a generic term for any fictional tale). This in itself is an interesting insight into the trip, does this mean to be more appealing to more people, we as a storytelling community in the UK have to look to this, or is it just a cultural difference. Having spoken a lot to Csenge Zalka at the NSN conference about this (Csenge is from Hungary, which also has a long history of ‘folk’ tales) we both, having worked with youth in our own countries have seen how ‘folk’ tales are still popular, and so at this stage my belief is that it is more of a cultural thing, but that we must be aware that personal tales are a great way of giving a voice to young people who can often feel like no one is listening.

But net result is that far from being devoid of youth talent, Toronto has a wealth of youth talent bubbling away, but it might need a to be sort out in a new fashion.

And then before I knew it, and far too soon I was on a flight to St John’s, and flying into the airport I saw hilltops and coast line which could have been mistaken for Scotland, and colourful houses which would look at home in Balormory. The place is awash with Irish accents, and I have finally found out why East Killbride in Scotland doesn’t have just a Killbride, cos its here in Canada, so East Killbride is VERY east!

I arrived at the hostel at 6pm dropped my bags headed into town (finding within mins a chocolate shop… my true chocoholic nature is far from the surface) grabbed some food and found Hava Java, the venue for tonight’s Storytelling circle, and finally met at long last Dale Jarvis, which was a strange first meeting as I many an email has gone back and forth, and so many people have talked to me about him it really didn’t feel like a first meeting. What an evening of diverse stories, and international tellers, besides myself there were tellers from Spain, Wales, Ireland and then plenty of local talent. After which Dale and his partner took me up to Signal hill to look down over St John’s at night, a beautiful sight… a good way to end the day.

Friday the 13th was – and that is all that can be said, roll on the radio interview at 9am local time Saturday 14th, but I shall leave with that view…

Over looking St John's at night

Over looking St John's at night